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Tuesday, 27th October 2015
In Events In Japan,

How Japan has embraced Halloween

Halloween is not a traditional holiday in Japan, but like many influences from the west, the country has taken in on and made it its own.

In cities across the nation it is possible to see the decorations and build-up to the celebration, with special events organised for a number of places.

While in many countries Halloween is mostly for children, it is adults who tend to participate most fully in Japan.

Over-the-top costumes are adopted and the most intricate of make-up applied, as parades and parties are scheduled to take place in most urban centres, reports Deep Japan.

There are also plenty of Halloween-themed items to buy in the shops, from Hello Kitty decked out in a pumpkin costume to cakes, ice cream and fast food given a ghoulish twist.

Among the biggest Halloween events in Japan is the Kawasaki Halloween Parade for kids, which sees the Tokyo shopping centre completely taken over by the spectacle.

Anyone wishing to walk in the parade must register to do so in advance, but the incredible decorations are up for weeks in October, so it is worth visiting to see them.

Adults will be flocking to the Metropolis Halloween Glitterball, which has become something of an annual tradition.

This huge party features a costume contest and various themed areas, with a new addition this year being Jungle Book of the Dead.

The popular entertainment and shopping district of Shibuya in Tokyo is one of the hippest places to be at Halloween.

Although there is no official holiday event, revellers come early on October 31st and are all dressed up for a night of partying ahead of them.

Meanwhile, Universal Studios in Osaka has been celebrating Halloween since September 11th and will continue to do so until November 8th.



Related news stories:
Tokyo?s hotels reveal their Halloween offerings (14th October 2016)
Tokyo Grand Tea Ceremony (18th September 2014)
Disney announces further plans for Tokyo Disney in 2015 (17th March 2015)
A quarter of Japan?s population 65 or over (30th June 2016)