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Monday, 12th December 2011
In General Japan News,

Saline water will fell 'Miracle Pine'

The future of an ancient pine tree which was alone in withstanding the tsunami on March 11th has been thrown into questions after it emerged its roots have begun to rot because of the continued presence of saline water.

One of 70,000 pine trees which stood proud and tall in a beautifully picturesque area of Rikuzentakata in the Iwate Prefecture, the pine tree was the only one left standing following the tsunami, leading locals to dub it the "miracle pine", the Mainichi Daily reported.

Now, it seems as though the final tree will succumb to the same fate as the others, with the Japan Greenery Research and Development Centre reporting that it will eventually be brought down by the saline water.

Having stood for 260 years, the 30m tall tree has since produced four grafts that are being cultivated in a breeding centre in the hope of eventually restoring the line of pine trees to their former glory.

Yoshihisa Suzuki, the 66-year-old leader of a local conservation group, told the newspaper: "It will take around 300 years to restore the lines of pine trees, but we will get the job done."

Last week, American scientists discovered that the tsunami was in a fact a double-tsunami in a freak of nature that had never been witnessed before.

Written by Mark Smith



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