Chubu

Offering the most diversity of any region, the Chubu region covers central Japan, stretching west along the Pacific coast as far as Kyoto, and north across the imposing mountains of the Japanese Alps to the Sea of Japan.

The industrial powerhouse of Nagoya forms the economic backbone of the region, Toyota cars rolling off the production lines by the hundreds of thousands. But it is perhaps the bustling market towns such as Takayama, the smaller cities like Matsumoto and Kanazawa, and the awe-inspiring peaks of the Alps that truly characterise Chubu - an area that encapsulates so much of the endless diversity of the country.

  • Chubu is an extraordinarily diverse region, boasting vibrant, modern cities, stunning alpine scenery, world-class ski resorts and beautifully preserved, ancient towns. You could easily spend two weeks in this region alone and not even cover half of its highlights.
    Matt Spiller - Agents Manager
  • Nagoya

    Oft abused and the butt of many a joke, Nagoya is in actual fact one of Japan's most pleasant and enjoyable cities to visit. Nagoya is at the heart of a region that shaped the course of Japanese history forever and continues to have a powerful influence on Japanese culture and the economy today.

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  • Kanazawa

    Kanazawa doesn't attract the visitors of Kyoto yet there is plenty to see and do. Kenrokuen is one of Japan's top three gardens, there is a charming geisha district, bustling morning market, and more traditional arts and crafts than can be listed.

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  • Matsumoto

    Matsumoto has a unique feel and a makes for a welcome contrast to the huge cities of the eastern seaboard. The 'Black Crow' castle rises dramatically over the city centre whilst local restaurants serve freshly made soba noodles and another local speciality, horse meat sashimi.

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  • Toyota

    Located at the far end of Nagoya's Meitetsu subway line, Toyota is of course most famous for being the home of the world's leading car manufacturer. However, modern day factories and urban development obscure a rich and significant history and a vibrant local culture and sense of community

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  • Shirakawago

    The tiny hamlets of Shirakawa-go are a must-see destination for those wanting to get to the heart of traditional Japan

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  • Takayama

    Situated more than 2000 ft above sea lea level and surrounded by the brooding peaks of the Japan Alps, Takayama is a bustling market town.

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  • Hakone

    Set in the mountainous countryside just to the South of Mt. Fuji, Hakone offers a curious mix of different attractions. Whether you wish to bathe in the onsen waters, admire views of Mt. Fuji, eat eggs boiled in sulphurous springs, visit world class art museums, or simply relax, Hakone has it all.

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  • Kamikochi

    This is the Japan which most Westerners don't know exists, a haven of truly outstanding natural beauty, home to wild bears (rarely seen), monkeys (keen to exhibit themselves), and many other varieties of animal and bird life.

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  • Norikura

    Situated on the magnificent Skyline Road, the highest in Japan, this alpine village has some spectacular views, lots of hiking trails, summer skiing at Daisekkei, and a great collection of hot spring baths.

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  • Tsumago

    Picture Japan as it was hundreds of years ago; unspoiled nature surrounded small villages of wooden buildings; main streets were filled with little more than foot traffic and the voices of shopkeepers selling their wares. Tsumago is just that, a lazy town tucked away in the Kiso valley.

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  • Niigata

    Niigata city is capital of the prefecture of the same name, and is a pleasant place, with plenty of open spaces, making the city feel more spacious and less cramped than other major cities of Japan. Delicious sake, top quality rice and fantastic seafood are just a few of the reasons to visit.

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  • Sado Island

    Sado ga Shima is the 6th largest island in the Japanese archipelago, lying just off the city of Niigata on the Japan sea coast. The island offers beautiful coastal scenery, quaint fishing villages and an altogether slower pace of life.

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  • Noto Peninsula

    The Noto Hanto, known in Japan as 'The Crooked Finger', is a 100km peninsula that juts into the Sea of Japan between Kanazawa and Toyama in northern Ishikawa Prefecture.

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  • Centrair

    Centrair (or Central Japan International Airport to give its official title) is the latest addition to Japan's growing collection of off-shore airports, the first and most ambitious of which was of course, Osaka's Kansai Airport.

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  • Naeba

    One of the most famous Japanese ski and snowboarding resorts, Naeba and its surrounding resorts are collectively known as ‘Powder Heaven'. But most foreign visitors don't head here in winter but at the height of summer for Japan's premiere musical festival, Fuji Rock.

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  • Yudanaka

    Few visitors to Japan will not have seen images of the monkeys relaxing in the steaming hot springs surrounded by the banked drifts of heavy snow and thick forest. That place is Yudanaka Onsen and a visit to see our simian friends kicking back and taking it easy will be a highlight of any trip.

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  • Shimoda

    Shimoda town at the southern point of the Izu Peninsula is a beautiful destination, offering hot springs, historic sights and good beaches.

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  • Nagano

    Nagano has a history stretching back to the Kamakura period (1185-1333) when it was a temple town centred around Zenko-ji temple. The temple is still Nagano's main attraction with more than 4 million visitors a year.

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  • Mt Fuji

    The snow-capped summit of Fuji-san is an icon of Japan; a glorious, near symmetrical volcano which stands alone, soaring to the heavens, a constant reminder of Japan's age-old relationship with the earth and the spirits within. For the Japanese, Mt. Fuji is a lot more than just another mountain.

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  • Shiga Kogen

    In a land of fantastic winter sports resorts, Shiga-Kogen stands as one of the very best. One of the world's largest winter resorts there are enough runs here to keep you occupied for a month!

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  • Hakuba

    Better known in recent years, Hakuba played host to the the 1998 Olympic skijumping, alpine downhill and super-G events. This is a world-class resort with more than enough to entertain even the most experienced enthusiast. And in summer you can hit the bike trails, go rafting, horseriding or hiking.

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  • Magome

    In the heart of the Japanese Alps, nestled in the Kiso valley, far away from fast moving trains and neon lights, lies a slice of old Japan. Surrounded by the stunning natural beauty of central Japan's Chubu region, this quiet post town has been referred to as a woodblock print come to life.

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  • Obuse

    With its museums, sake breweries and local cuisine Obuse is a great place for all art and food lovers. The small town with its narrow streets and traditional charm is renowned for the painter Hokusai who is best known for "Wave of the Coast at Kanagawa" and several museums are dedicated to

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